Hello stamped boxes!

Check out this project that allows kids to learn about stamping and cooperation while creating a box able to be used to gift-giving.

art studio for kids njThis project is great to do near the holiday season: parents love to use these to package their gifts with a handmade flair.

Age Level: 2.5 and up

Objectives:

  • Eye-hand coordination
  • Introduction to stamping
  • Cooperation and sharing

holiday project for kids nj art classes for kidsMaterials:

  • Tempera paint
  • Objects to use for stamping: we used two types of potato mashers and lego type blocks
  • Paper plates to use as palettes
  • Cardboard boxes: ours are 4” x 6” when folded, approx 18 x 24 when opened flat
  • Extra paper in case kids want to keep stamping
  • Stickers to be used as name tags

Teacher Preparation:

  • Place two or three coordinating colors on a paper plate, one plate per every two children. Having two children share one palette encourages sharing and cooperation. We used teal, silver, and gold paints: the metallic color adds a festive touch.
  • Create a name tag on the stickers for each student to put on their project. We do this so we don’t have to worry about writing the student’s name on the project and potentially smearing it. This way, we can pass by and quickly add a sticker to the project without interrupting the artist at work.
  • Place stamping objects on tray.
  • Create a sample projects.

Procedures:

the messy artistShow the students a completed sample project. Explain that they will be stamping onto an unfolded box that they can then use to give a gift to someone special when it is dry.   Show them how the box will start out flat, and then will be folded into a box.

Demonstrate dipping an object into paint and stamping onto the box.   Show them that they can create different patterns by using different objects. Before stamping with the lego, ask them what shape they think it will make. Stamp with it and then show them the result so they can see if their guess was correct.

Have the class assistant place the tray with stamping objects on the supply table and have the children walk over to select one tool to start with.art classes parties and camps new jersey toddler art project

While the children are doing this, place the boxes and paper plate palettes on the table. When they return, they can start stamping. Tell them they can stand up if that is easier – often times that allows them greater success in stamping.festive boxes project for kids

After the children have made a few stamps, encourage them to trade tools with their neighbor so they can try making some new patterns on their boxes.new jersey art class for children

kids stamping projectWhen the children have finished, place the boxes to dry, and if time allows, provide paper for the children to keep stamping if they wish.

These take a little while to dry and can go home the next class session.best art class nj holiday gift giving project for kids

 

Hello Thanksgiving!

We wish you all a fantastic Thanksgiving! Please share with us here what you are thankful for – in words or pictures. We’d love to see it!

the messy artist thanksgivingWhile we can’t quite believe that the holiday season of the year is upon us, we are happy to embrace its sentiments. With Thanksgiving here next week, we are feeling thankful for all that we have in our lives, and feeling very grateful.

Our students are always at the top of our list of what we are thankful for, and we are grateful for every family who takes a class with us, has a birthday party here, comes to summer camp, etc, etc. So many wonderful people have passed through our doors over the past 16 years.  Here just a few:

One way we are expressing our gratitude for all to see is by taking part in the Gratitude Graffiti Project again this year. Everyone is invited to come draw (or write) on our windows with paint pens about what they are grateful for. It’s open to everyone – students or not. When we started this year’s project, a couple staff members went out to write on the window. At the same time, they both wrote “Art”!.   That is another item at the top of the list that we are thankful for.

Another way we are expressing our thankfulness this month is by hosting a food drive for the Community Soup Kitchen of Morristown. The staff is donating food and other supplies to locals in need, and we welcome donations from the public as well. Donations can be brought by any time the studio is open; there is a box in the entryway to receive them.   We are proud to be able to “pay it forward” to such a wonderful organization.

Current Needs flyer w MA infoWe wish you all a fantastic Thanksgiving! Please share with us what you are thankful for – in words or pictures.  We’d love to see it!

How art can get your child to eat vegetables!

the messy artistWe had something happen in class recently that, although unusual for an art class, had all parents thrilled: their children demanded to eat broccoli!

As we do each session, our classes (even for the youngest students) follow a theme. In a recent session, our focus was on colors, and one week we featured green. Our classroom was full of examples of different materials using the color green: green play dough, green paint at the easels, green slime at the messy table. The project table had a special green project: green broccoli dipped in green paint to stamp on green paper.

We like to incorporate a vegetable or fruit stamping project into our curriculum most seasons for our youngest students. This is a fun way for students to create some art out of unusual objects, and the broccoli was perfect for this.

Not only did the students enjoy stamping with the broccoli, they were curious about its taste.   We provided some clean, non-paint covered broccoli and they all tried it. Even better, most of them liked it and wanted more! Since it proved to be so popular, we did it with all sections of our Monet class, and have now added it to the lesson plan.

We love how the children were inspired to try broccoli after using it to create art. It perfectly ties into our Artist Harvest sculpture project’s mission: using art to stimulate a love of healthy eating in children.printing with vegetables nj kids art

Four thought provoking articles about art education

What’s the state of the arts in New Jersey’s public-school classrooms today?
This article from September 2105 looks at how NJ public schools are faring in terms of the arts. There’s good (97 percent of all students have access to classes on the fine arts, music or drama), bad (concerns about PARCC testing cutting into arts time) and ugly (one in five New Jersey schools doesn’t offer both music and visual arts, as required by the state). Read about more in this report from the recent Arts Education Summit.

As an art studio, we are passionate about the power that creating art has to shape lives.   The ability to tap into one’s creativity has far-reaching influences, not only in education but in much of daily life. Used not just when “making art”, these benefits – ingenuity, confidence to think outside the box, making connections between seemingly disparate objects, and yes, an appreciation and understanding of beauty and design – color how one interacts with the world.

art studio for kids njHere are four articles that we have come across recently that have gotten us thinking. Please share with us anything you have come across that you have found thought provoking as well – we’d love to start a dialogue.benefits of art education

  1. Childhood Creativity Leads to Innovation in Adulthood: Researchers link arts and crafts in childhood to financial success in adulthood.

This article focuses on a study at Michigan State, following students who had consistently taken art classes (from early childhood through age 14). “The most interesting finding was the importance of sustained participation in those activities,” said Rex LaMore, director of MSU’s Center for Community and Economic Development.

Read more in the article about the things that were learned form this study.

art education and kidshttp://www.psychologytoday.stfi.re/blog/the-athletes-way/201310/childhood-creativity-leads-innovation-in-adulthood?sf=ezpjra&utm_content=buffer557b4&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

  1. 7 Leadership Skills Fostered in Arts Education.

We love this list, which includes “Understanding the Power of Myth and Symbols” and “Project Planning”, as well “Learning to be Yourself”. Check out the article for more great insights on leadership skills art education provides.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/7-leadership-skills-fostered-arts-education-stacey-goodmanart education for kids

  1. What’s the state of the arts in New Jersey’s public-school classrooms today?

This article from September 2105 looks at how NJ public schools are faring in terms of the arts. There’s good (97 percent of all students have access to classes on the fine arts, music or drama), bad (concerns about PARCC testing cutting into arts time) and ugly (one in five New Jersey schools doesn’t offer both music and visual arts, as required by the state). Read about more in this report from the recent Arts Education Summit.

http://www.njspotlight.com/stories/15/09/28/what-s-the-state-of-the-arts-in-new-jersey-s-classrooms-today/the messy artist

  1. STEM vs. STEAM: Do the Arts Belong?

Surprisingly, it’s not a slam-dunk to include the arts! There are arguments both for and against adding Art into the STEM disciplines (Science, Technology Engineering and Math) in this article.

http://www.edweek.org/tm/articles/2014/11/18/ctq-jolly-stem-vs-steam.html?cmp=eml-enl-tu-mostpop